As the widespread economic impacts of the coronavirus (COVID-19) worsen, Governor Gavin Newsom has issued Executive Order N-28-20 to assist Californians experiencing financial hardship. The order implements measures specifically aimed at helping homeowners, tenants, borrowers and others that have lost their source of income due to business closures or layoffs in the wake of COVID-19.

As the coronavirus (COVID-19) continues to spread, rapidly evolving economic and social changes are presenting a host of legal issues for the real estate industry. Attorneys at Perkins Coie, LLP, have published guidance on some of the more pressing issues affecting developers, landlords, tenants, and lenders. The guidance, prepared by Cecily T. Barclay, Allan E.

A homeowner who invoked his HOA’s dispute resolution process regarding tree-trimming requirements and was sued by another homeowner based on that application could successfully bring an anti-SLAPP motion on the ground that the suit interfered with exercise of First Amendment rights.  Colyear v Rolling Hills Community Association of Rancho Palos Verdes, No. B270396 (2

Perkins Coie attorneys — most of whom contribute regularly to this report — recently presented the 25th Annual Land Use & Development Law Breakfast Briefing in Palo Alto, San Francisco and Walnut Creek.   The presentation focused on 2014 developments and trends in land use, affordable housing, school facilities financing, CEQA, real estate and environmental and

On Tuesday April 9, Perkins Coie hosted “Housing Summit: 30,000 Homes by 2020,” the Mayor’s housing plan to build more housing and to make San Francisco housing affordable.  The Housing Summit was held at International Hotel Senior Housing Project, an important symbol of the City’s historic housing struggles and a reminder of how affordable housing

Can a city protect itself from discriminatory zoning claims by adopting a facially neutral ordinance that treats similarly situated land uses the same? Apparently not, said the Ninth Circuit in Pacific Shores Properties v. City of Newport Beach (Case No. 11-55460), decided on September 20. In a challenge brought against a City of Newport Beach zoning ordinance imposing restrictions on group homes, the court ruled that the plaintiffs could prevail merely by showing that the City acted with discriminatory animus.
Continue Reading Ninth Circuit Clarifies Standards For Housing Discrimination Claims

The answer is yes, as long as the arbitration clause is not unreasonable, according to the California Supreme Court in Pinnacle Museum Tower Association v. Pinnacle Market Development (July 16, 2012).

In Pinnacle, the developer recorded CC&Rs before the condo project homeowners association was formed.  The CC&Rs contained a mandatory procedure for resolution of construction